2022 Honda Insight hybrid starts $2,000 higher, still gets 52 mpg

The 2022 Honda Insight hybrid sedan gets a price bump for the new model year, but retains its 52 mpg combined EPA fuel-economy rating. The price increase is largely due to the elimination of the base LX trim level, leaving only the EX and Touring trim levels. The 2022 Honda Insight EX starts at $26,205, […]

The 2022 Honda Insight hybrid sedan gets a price bump for the new model year, but retains its 52 mpg combined EPA fuel-economy rating.

The price increase is largely due to the elimination of the base LX trim level, leaving only the EX and Touring trim levels. The 2022 Honda Insight EX starts at $26,205, while the 2021 Insight LX had a $23,885 base price. Both prices include mandatory destination charges of $955 for the 2021 model year and $995 for the 2022 model year.

Honda also raised the base prices of the two remaining Insight trim levels by $400, before the higher destination charge is applied. With destination, the fancier Touring trim level starts at $30,235 for 2022.

No apparent changes were made to specifications or feature content. The Insight EX gets the same 52 mpg combined (55 mpg city, 49 mpg highway) as before, while the Insight Touring is still rated at 48 mpg combined (51 mpg city, 45 mpg highway).

2022 Honda Insight

2022 Honda Insight

The Insight’s powertrain consists of a 1.5-liter Atkinson-cycle inline-4 engine, coupled to Honda’s two-motor hybrid system. Toyota system output remains unchanged, at 151 horsepower.

Although Honda has taken away the Insight LX, it’s recently added a base Accord Hybrid—effectively making the larger Accord Hybrid just $1,360 more than the Insight.

With Honda slimming down the Insight lineup, this brings back into focus the idea that Honda might be preparing a high-mpg hybrid version of the new Civic hatchback. The Insight uses the body shell from the outgoing 10th-generation Civic sedan, with similar interior dimensions but different exterior styling, so a return to Civic Hybrid branding wouldn’t be much of a stretch.

Honda has opted not to bring the latest Fit, which is offered only as a hybrid, to the United States—although the U.S.-market HR-V crossover might arrive as a hybrid. The automaker also plans to launch a series of electric cars starting mid-decade, but until then it plans to emphasize hybrids.