Gordon Murray Automotive T.33 revealed, only slightly less intense than T.50

Following up on its first supercar – the now sold-out T.50 – Gordon Murray Automotive has a second road-going model, the T.33. While still a striking-looking machine, it’s actually a bit toned down compared to its predecessor. But that’s not to say it’s going to be dull in comparison. It still packs a wildly high-revving […]

Following up on its first supercarthe now sold-out T.50 – Gordon Murray Automotive has a second road-going model, the T.33. While still a striking-looking machine, it’s actually a bit toned down compared to its predecessor. But that’s not to say it’s going to be dull in comparison. It still packs a wildly high-revving V12, a manual transmission and a light chassis.

While the T.50 had some influences from Murray’s past supercar claim to fame, the McLaren F1, the T.33 seems to channel much older sports cars. It has undulating, curvaceous fenders. It hardly has a crease or interrupted arc anywhere. It also has rounded, simplistic light housings. The body and chassis are made of carbon fiber and aluminum, like the T.50, and it’s supposed to be very light. The company is targeting a weight of under 2,425 pounds, which is a bit heavier than the T.50, which weighs in at barely over 2,000 pounds. Worth noting is the lack of a rear fan for the ground effects like the T.50. Still, the T.33 has a carefully designed underbody to generate downforce without needing much in the way of wings and splitters. It does feature a pop-up rear wing, though.

The flowing body hides similar mechanical components to the T.50. The T.33 gets a modified version of the 3.9-liter Cosworth V12. In this application, it makes 607 horsepower and 333 pound-feet of torque, all without the aid of forced induction. It revs a tad lower than the T.50’s engine with a redline of 11,100 rpm, but that’s obviously far higher than most road cars. The tweaked specs are a result of various changes such as cam profiles and engine tuning. The engine can be coupled to either a fully manual six-speed transmission or a sequential, paddle-shifted transmission. Power only goes to the rear through a limited-slip differential. Suspension is double-wishbone all around, and Brembo six-piston front calipers and four-piston rear calipers slow the T.33 down. And as a sign of GMA’s continued desire to enhance driver involvement, the T.33 has hydraulic power steering.

Unlike the T.50’s central driving position, the T.33 has a conventional layout with the driver on one side and the passenger on the other. The interior is minimalist and focused on physical switch gear. All of the control knobs and the instrument surround are made of aluminum, while the seats and steering wheel are made from carbon fiber. Cargo capacity totals 9.9 cubic feet, and it’s divided up by compartments under the hood and behind both rear fenders.

GMA will build only 100 T.33s, and it will be legal in the U.S. It will be quite expensive with a price tag of 1.37 million pounds, or about $1.83 million. Buyers who order T.33s can expect their cars to arrive sometime in 2024.

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