Redesigned Ducati Monster gains power and loses weight

Ducati gave its all-new Monster an official unveiling via its five-part Ducati World Première web series, promising that the latest version of its popular naked motorcycle will officially hit dealerships in April 2021. The storied Italian manufacturer claims the new version sticks closely to the original from 1993, with a powerful engine tuned for road […]

Ducati gave its all-new Monster an official unveiling via its five-part Ducati World Première web series, promising that the latest version of its popular naked motorcycle will officially hit dealerships in April 2021. The storied Italian manufacturer claims the new version sticks closely to the original from 1993, with a powerful engine tuned for road use mated to a compact “superbike-derived frame,” and the numbers bear that out.

Power comes from Ducati’s Testastretta 11° twin-cylinder engine displacing 937 cubic centimeters. The not-quite-literbike spins out 111 horsepower at 9,250 rpm and 69 pound-feet of torque. That’s a bit more power than the Monster 821 it replaces, but perhaps more important, the new Monster loses around 40 pounds compared to the outgoing edition, for a total wet weight of 414 pounds.

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That engine is housed in an aluminum frame that shares its design with Ducati’s powerful Panigale V4. The subframe is made from a glass fiber reinforced polymer composite material (more commonly known as fiberglass), while the redesigned swingarm and wheels further shed weight. The standard seat height is listed at a reasonable 32.3 inches, but an accessory seat and different springs can lower that to 30.5 inches. The riding position has been relaxed a bit, which ought to make for a comfortable riding experience.

ABS cornering, traction control and wheelie control are all standard and adjustable, while Sport, Urban and Touring riding modes allow the rider to tune the bike to their needs. A digital dash is also standard.

The redesigned Ducati Monster will start at $11,895 here in the States, while a Monster Plus gets sportier bodywork at a starting price of $12,395.

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